Policy AA-FH-PO9 Academic Workload Policy
 

  1. Policy
  2. Definitions
  3. Relevant Federal and State Statutes
  4. Relevant UT System and UTA Policies, Procedures, and Forms
  5. Who Should Know
  6. UTA Officer(s) Responsible for Policy
  7. Dates Approved or Amended
  8. Contact Information 
  1. Policy
     

    Purpose
     

    The purpose of this operating policy is to establish workload policy and rules for determining faculty workload at the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) in compliance with UT System Regents Rule 31006 Faculty Workload and Reporting Requirements. The UT Regents’ vote on Rule 31006 on November 9, 2017 authorizes each academic institution to develop faculty workload policies that optimize efforts in support of student success and institutional advancement. UTA’s workload policy aligns with Rule 31006 and acknowledges the range of activities encompassing the breadth of faculty workload.
     

    Procedures
     

    The workload of each full time and part-time faculty member encompasses teaching, research, service, and in some cases, administrative duties as determined by each department and college/school with recognition of contributions to student success. Each faculty member’s teaching load, including the number of credit hours taught or equivalent duties as assigned by the department chair or comparable academic administrator in consultation with each faculty member, is but one aspect of workload. In assigning faculty to their various duties, department chairs or comparable academic administrators must assign workload so that:

    • Overall workload distribution shall be equitable and fair to all faculty of differing rank, disciplinary area, gender, race, etc. and in a manner that is consistent with the unit’s mission;
    • The departments, schools and colleges meet their instructional obligations to both undergraduate and graduate programs and students;
    • The departments, schools and colleges deploy faculty resources to maximize support for student success;
    • The workload guidelines for each college/school acknowledge faculty participation in research, teaching, service and administrative duties.
       

    Each college/school develops workload guidelines through a shared governance process. These guidelines are reviewed by the Office of the Provost for compliance with the new university policy. In addition, units used the following guidelines to develop and implement workload processes:

    • Individual faculty workload assignments shall be determined by the department chair or comparable academic administrator (or his/her designee) in consultation with each faculty member on an annual basis. Faculty workload is negotiated yearly and is subject to needs of the department and college/school such as budget, course rotation/programmatic needs and student success initiatives as examples.
    • Faculty shall retain the right to appeal workload assignments through established institutional grievance processes.
    • Institutional evaluation policies for faculty, including those at tenure and/or promotion, annual evaluation, and post-tenure reviews, shall be aligned with the faculty member’s workload distribution. For each faculty member, the workload report shall reflect expectations and time required to complete that work.
    • Workload policies, assignments, and reports shall be available for review by faculty and should be easily accessible.
    • Institutional workload assignment and reporting policies shall acknowledge that faculty workload distribution may vary over the course of one’s career.
    • College and school workload guidelines will be reviewed every five years by college and school faculty.
       

    Workload Credits (WLCs) may be divided between teaching, research, service, and administration. A suggested customary WLC distribution for tenured and tenure-track (T/TT) Faculty assignment is 40% teaching, 40% research, 20% service, and 0% administration, and for non-tenure track (NTT) faculty 80% teaching, 0% research, and 20% service, and 0% administration or 100% teaching. 
     

    College/school and departmental policies denote how WLC is allocated and workload assigned across the four primary areas of teaching, research, service, and administration. Faculty may vary in their assigned workload distribution per the processes defined in Regents’ Rule 31006 and annual and periodic review. UTA Handbook of Operating Policies Policy 6-500, Section 6-505 (Minimum Faculty Academic Workload Requirements) workload distribution will be used in assessing overall annual, periodic, promotion and tenure, and other faculty evaluations such that assessments of areas of work are weighted by assigned workload. While the quality of work is of primary importance, the total workload should be considered as well (e.g., a faculty member producing significantly more than the standard WLC in a year).
     

    Research and Creative Activities


    Research and creative activities conducted by faculty are discipline-specific and vary greatly among academic departments. The UTA workload policy takes this diversity of faculty research activities into account including scholarly efforts geared towards student success. Each department and college/school shall establish criteria for assessing and reporting workload credits arising from research activities, especially those that enhance student success. 
     

    Each department must also have clear, measurable expectations for research workload that are aligned with the notion of “meets expectations” in the annual review. In addition, the guidelines must clearly define “exceeds expectations.”

    Professional development supporting research and creative activities should be defined by college and departmental policies and taken into consideration in determining workload credits.
     

    High research T/TT faculty may have a lighter teaching load as determined by the department chair or comparable academic administrator Also, NTT faculty may receive workload credit for research per their college/school guidelines.
     

    Teaching
     

    Teaching is an integral part of our university mission.  In order to meet college teaching responsibilities, teaching load shall be set by colleges, schools, and departments/programs to be aligned with their disciplines and peers, and in consideration of a faculty member’s total contribution in research, creative productivity, professional achievement, and service. 
     

    Tenure-track faculty in years 1-5 (probationary faculty) may receive a lighter teaching load to accommodate the development of their research agendas.

    For tenured faculty, teaching loads may be adjusted for teaching productivity as  measured by class size, for either high or low research or scholarship productivity, for either high or low productivity in external funded research and other discipline specific measures, and for significant service and administrative appointments.  Teaching workload may be adjusted by the buyout of courses from funds provided by external grants or from funds associated with endowed faculty appointment.  College guidelines should specify maximum buyout of organized courses along with exception criteria.

    Tenured faculty members with low research and service contributions are expected to teach up to eight courses per academic year as a recognition that teaching is their primary contribution to the unit.
     

    For full-time non-tenure stream faculty, their primary responsibility is instruction of organized courses, service, and professional development.  The teaching load is nominally ten courses per year depending on service or administrative obligations. 
     

    Faculty support student success in many ways beyond the traditional classroom. Faculty’s role in the student experience and student success is vital. Faculty activities outside of the classroom and those that contribute to students’ sense of belonging as well as academic success are an integral part of faculty work and need to enter into any workload calculation. Workload credits include, but are not restricted to, the following examples:

    • Participation in college/school or university student success initiatives and activities.
    • The creation of programs, courses and projects relevant to internships and career development, service learning, leadership, student research and study abroad opportunities that contribute to the Maverick Advantage (high impact practice participation) and student success.
    • Participation in faculty advising, mentoring and coaching programs to enhance student belonging.
    • Development of new curricula, programs or courses (face-to-face and online), and instructional and curricular redesign to promote student engagement and student success.
    • A research example of a student success effort is the investigation of the pedagogy of teaching that maximizes student learning effectiveness.
    • The development, teaching (individual or team) and enhancement of first year experience, independent study, conference course, lab/studio and practicum courses.
    • Chairing or serving on Master’s Thesis, Project Report committees, and Dissertation committees.
    • Training and supporting of teaching and research assistants.

    The responsibility of assigning teaching duties resides with the unit/department heads and deans. The Office of the Provost monitors these assignments for compliance and equity, and provides appropriate reports in accordance with state requirements and the UT Regents’ Rules.
     

    Overload
     

    An overload is defined in UTA policy as teaching an organized course that produces workload in excess of 100% workload distribution in an academic year, not including Summer (for nine-month contract). Solely exceeding 100% workload distribution does not automatically justify academic overload compensation. 
     

    Courses taught as an instructional overload may not be used for credit towards future workload obligations if they are compensated in addition to regular salary. Compensation may be in the form of either financial compensation, a reduced course load in the same academic year or following year if the department teaching obligations and budget permit, or adjusted workload assignments in other areas (viz., research, service, administration).
     

    Equivalences
     

    Regents’ Rule 31006 states that “each institution may give the same or different weight to each activity and to other activities recognized by the institution as important elements of faculty workloads.”
     

    To allow consistency for reporting and analysis, UTA provides a list of equivalencies in its Workload Manual.

    • Additional value for organized instruction maybe set by the college/school guidelines as impacted by course size, whether it is face-to-face or online, length of course or other criteria.
    • Additional credit may be provided to teaching loads for labs, studios, dissertation/thesis advising, post-doctoral training, and other courses requiring extensive interaction between students and faculty as determined by each college/school's guidelines.
    • Teaching load for large undergraduate classes that require extensive grading and evaluation of student work may be weighted based on enrollment of course or other criteria as stipulated in the college/school guidelines.
    • Professional development supporting teaching should be defined by each college/school in departmental policies and taken into consideration in determining workload credit.
       

    Service
     

    Service encompasses a faculty member’s contributions to departmental, college, university, or system activities or to a faculty member’s profession, community and public service as related to the discipline. Faculty members are expected to participate in and contribute to service activities at UTA . 
     

    As a public institution is committed to student success, UTA values the role that faculty play in engaging with students, student support services and other programs that partner with students on their path to graduation. Faculty should receive service credit for these activities commensurate with the amount of time and commitment these activities require.  Note that some of the workload directly contributing to student success mentioned above under ‘Teaching’ may also be considered ‘Service’ workload here. Faculty cannot count these activities for both categories and must decide, in consultation with their department chair or comparable academic administrator, in which area (e.g. teaching or service) they are to receive credit for the student success activities.

    Each department and college/school shall establish criteria for assessing and reporting workload credits arising from service activities. In no case will the service workload for tenured or tenure-stream faculty be below 10%, as all faculty must participate in shared governance and basic service duties to the department, college, university, or system. Service load will vary for NTT faculty and may be zero. 
     

    As a general guideline, service activities include any functions performed in the best interests of the state, system, or university, which do not qualify as administrative, instructional, or scholarly activities. Common service activities include: (1) participation in system, university, college/school, and departmental committees; (2) representation on university/system bodies such as the Graduate Assembly, Faculty Advisory Council, Faculty Senate, and Undergraduate Assembly; (3) work performed on behalf of academic, professional, scholarly, or student organizations, (4) development of on and off campus activities contributing to student sense of belonging and success, and (5) other work as may be defined by college and department workload policies. 
     

    Administration


    An administrative appointment is an assignment granted to a faculty member at the departmental, college/school or university level.  
     

    Each department and college/school shall establish criteria for assessing and reporting workload credits arising from administrative activities. At a minimum, colleges/schools and departments will have policies defining administrative workload levels/credits associated with the following administrative positions: (1) dean, associate dean, or assistant dean; (2) school director, chair, associate chair, or assistant chair; (3) program director or coordinator; (4) director of a university center or institute; (5) section coordinator; or (6) other administrative assignment designated by the college/department. 
     

    The President, Provost, Dean, or Chair/Director appoints individuals to these positions. The Dean will take into account program and department size, complexity (such as the number of reporting units, enrollment cycles, online programs, accreditation reporting and evaluation cycles such as re-accreditation years, etc.), multiple degree formats, student success needs (such as evaluation of advising access and DFW rates), and other reasonable factors affecting work time in determining the appropriate workload credit for administrative tasks.  
     

    Professional development supporting development of administrative skills should be defined by college/school and departmental policies and taken into consideration in annual evaluation.

  2. Definitions
     

    Administration: An administrative appointment is an assignment granted to a faculty member at the departmental, college or university level. Administrative appointments include 1) dean, associate dean, or assistant dean; (2) chair, associate chair, or assistant chair; (3) program director; (4) director of a university center or institute; (5) section coordinator; or (6) other administrative assignment designated by the college/department. 
     

    Faculty: People hired to teach classes at institutions of higher education or whose specific assignments are for the purpose of conducting instruction, research, or public service as a principal activity (or activities) and who may hold academic rank titles of professor, associate professor, assistant professor, instructor, other faculty or the equivalent of any of these academic ranks. (CBM008: http://www.thecb.state.tx.us/reports/PDF/1316.PDF?CFID=77237381&CFTOKEN=53644601)
     

    Overload: A faculty member who is employed full time and has a teaching assignment that produces workload in excess of a 100% assignment in an academic year not including Summer (if a nine-month contract).

    Research and Creative Activity: Percent of time, in relation to a normal workload as defined by the institution, devoted to faculty assignments in activities specifically designed to produce research and creative activity outcomes.
     

    Service: Service encompasses a faculty member’s contributions to departmental, college, university, or system activities or to a faculty member’s profession, community and public service as related to the discipline. Common service activities include: (1) participation in system, university, college/school, and departmental committees; (2) representation on university/system bodies such as the Graduate Assembly, Faculty Advisory Council, Faculty Senate, and Undergraduate Assembly; (3) work performed on behalf of academic, charitable, professional, scholarly, or student organizations, and (4) other work as may be defined by college and department workload policies. 
     

    Teaching/Instructional Activity: Direct instructional activities which include interaction with students related to instruction, preparation for such instruction, and evaluation of student performance. The various types of instruction include: lecture, laboratory, practicum, seminar, independent study, private lessons, self-paced instruction, televised instruction, supervision of thesis, and dissertation (http://www.thecb.state.tx.us/reports/pdf/0204.pdf)

  3. Relevant Federal and State Statutes
     

    Texas Education Code 51.402.c  https://texas.public.law/statutes/tex._educ._code_section_51.402 

    Coordinating Board Faculty Workload Policy Guidelines for Texas Public Universities http://www.thecb.state.tx.us/reports/pdf/0204.pdf)

  4. Relevant UT System and UTA Policies, Procedures, and Forms
     

    Regents’ Rule 31006 Faculty Workload and Reporting Requirements

    UTA Handbook of Operating Policies Policy 6-500 Rights, Responsibilities, and Duties of Faculty, Section 6-505

    UTA Faculty Workload Manual https://www.uta.edu/provost/administrative-forms/faculty-workload/manual.php

  5. Who Should Know
     

    All tenure, tenure-track, and non-tenure-track faculty and college/school/departmental chairs, deans and others responsible for communicating, monitoring, and reporting faculty workload information.

  6. UTA Officer(s) Responsible for Policy
     

    Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs

  7. Dates Approved or Amended
     

    March 21st, 2019

  8. Contact Information
     

    Inquiries should be directed to the Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs.